Comments for NASSR Graduate Student Caucus http://www.nassrgrads.com Resources for Graduate Students of Romanticism Thu, 02 Nov 2017 14:27:49 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.8 Comment on Is The Author Dead In Your Classroom? by Samantha Ellen Morse http://www.nassrgrads.com/is-the-author-dead-in-your-classroom/#comment-29847 Thu, 02 Nov 2017 14:27:49 +0000 http://www.nassrgrads.com/?p=8096#comment-29847 Jake, I’m glad you found this useful, and I really appreciate how you’ve pointed out the political stakes of this debate. I didn’t realize Barthes’s argument rippled beyond literary criticism into art history; very interesting!

I specialize in Gothic literature, which, as a field of study, owes a great deal to feminist revisionism. Ellen Moers, for example, who I reference in the article, coined the idea of the “female Gothic” in 1976, which basically refers to any Gothic novel written by a woman. Female vs male Gothic was a mainstay of critical discussions for the next two decades. So, an interest in the author and her intentions has been central to this field; however, Gothic studies have never been perceived as serious as, let’s say, research on Big 6 Romanticism or Victorian high realism. There are many reasons for this (a condescending attitude toward popular literature, for instance), but now I’m thinking the author-interest plays a part in that perception.

Still, Gothic studies continue to grow and gain traction in literary criticism as a whole. This probably has a lot to do with the growth of historicism, which makes context more important (even though, Farrell points out, it treats the author’s intentions as the elephant in the room).

I think the most important takeaway from Farrell’s book is that it is crucial to identify the author or artist’s communicative intentions (which is based on her identity and historical context). However, these intentions are not what make the work great, artistically speaking. It is navigating the relationship between historical/practical/ethical significance and aesthetic significance that I find most fascinating.

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Comment on Is The Author Dead In Your Classroom? by Jake Leveton http://www.nassrgrads.com/is-the-author-dead-in-your-classroom/#comment-29846 Thu, 02 Nov 2017 02:01:11 +0000 http://www.nassrgrads.com/?p=8096#comment-29846 Samantha, this is fabulous and for me a deeply important read.

I’m just interested in hearing a bit more from you on the subject: I’m curious if you feel there are political contingencies (both historically, or perhaps with recourse to the contemporary) that might make authorial intention more or less important for the engagement of specific texts.

In art history, this has been a matter of great contention, and predominately centered on identity politics. I’m thinking especially of work in feminist 19th-century art history, and that of S. Hollis Clayson.

For instance, just as the work of women artists was being excavated in 1960s and 1970s in more radical scholarship within the discipline, Barthes came along with the concept of authorial death and to some degree (though largely successfully resisted, we now have Mary Cassatt beside Claude Monet) foreclosed that particularly gendered critical revisionist possibility.

Do you feel that there’s been a similar or different vector involved in authorial intentionality in English studies?

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Comment on Contact Us by Eric Sirota http://www.nassrgrads.com/contact-us/#comment-29838 Mon, 16 Oct 2017 01:55:42 +0000 http://nassrgrads.wordpress.com/?page_id=15#comment-29838 If any of you happen to be in New York, you might be interested in a new musical based on Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, running Off-Broadway.
http://www.TheFrankensteinMusical.com
I started writing it when I was a graduate student myself, a long time ago. At that time I thought I would try to “follow” the novel. As I learned more about the medium of musical theatre, I realized that a good work of theatre has different needs than a novel. So I would rather say that it “honors” it’s source material.
I’d like to hear what you think.

-Eric Sirota

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Comment on You Are More Than Just A Graduate Student: Some Thoughts About That Elusive “Work-Life Balance” by DRN http://www.nassrgrads.com/you-are-more-than-just-a-graduate-student-some-thoughts-about-that-elusive-work-life-balance/#comment-29832 Sat, 14 Oct 2017 02:54:18 +0000 http://www.nassrgrads.com/?p=8074#comment-29832 Nice encouraging post.

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Comment on Romanticism’s Microcosms by Microcosms of poets, naturalists, and fire-and-brimstone preachers… | Adam Walker http://www.nassrgrads.com/romanticisms-microcosms/#comment-29722 Tue, 20 Jun 2017 12:09:45 +0000 http://www.nassrgrads.com/?p=8020#comment-29722 […] Romanticism’s Microcosms […]

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Comment on Gothic Poetry by Max http://www.nassrgrads.com/gothic-poetry/#comment-28722 Fri, 31 Mar 2017 20:31:10 +0000 http://www.nassrgrads.com/?p=7379#comment-28722 Nice article!

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Comment on Pride and Prejudice and Politics by D. B. Ruderman http://www.nassrgrads.com/pride-and-prejudice-and-politics/#comment-27210 Mon, 26 Dec 2016 21:05:08 +0000 http://www.nassrgrads.com/?p=7851#comment-27210 Excellent essay — it’s useful to me to think about as I prepare to teach the novel next semester as part of my Brit-Lit survey. As your essay points out and Austen’s narrative ramifies on several levels, the most “personal” and “intimate” of our expressions are always deeply social and political in nature.

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Comment on Pride and Prejudice and Politics by Tricia Matthew http://www.nassrgrads.com/pride-and-prejudice-and-politics/#comment-27160 Fri, 23 Dec 2016 12:59:12 +0000 http://www.nassrgrads.com/?p=7851#comment-27160 Thank you for this carefully considered post! You’ve given me a lot to think about.

I didn’t have a plan to discuss this political cycle with my students, but a week after the election, while discussing the conclusion of Shelley’s Valperga, I noticed most of my students were visibly upset and, without trying to stretch the story beyond historical recognition, saw parallels between the gendered constraints on full display in the novel and the way we all wrestled with the possibility of our first woman president. We make these kinds of connections in my British abolitionist lit. class (Appiah is particularly useful with Debbie Lee’s work on the subject), but the response to Valperga caught me off guard. I’m glad to have your essay here as a model to think about for next semester.

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Comment on Applying to Graduate School: On Writing the Statement of Purpose by Avrati http://www.nassrgrads.com/applying-to-graduate-school-on-writing-the-statement-of-purpose/#comment-27037 Tue, 13 Dec 2016 06:30:29 +0000 http://www.nassrgrads.com/?p=3313#comment-27037 crepi lupo!

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Comment on From Perish to Publish: Writing with Papers and Scrivener by Caroline Winter http://www.nassrgrads.com/taming-the-chaos-writing-with-papers-and-scrivener/#comment-26068 Tue, 11 Oct 2016 16:26:05 +0000 http://www.nassrgrads.com/?p=7261#comment-26068 Me too, Tracie. There was a definite learning curve to getting started, and there are still some bugs that I haven’t worked out.

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