• Summertime and Academic Livin’

    by  • June 13, 2014 • 0 Comments

    While technically it will not be summer until June 21st, most colleges and universities have ended their quarters and semesters by now (or are in the process of ending their quarters). Which means that we are all on summer break! As popular media would have it, that means that we are all going to...

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    Graphs in Romanticism Research

    by  • May 25, 2014 • 0 Comments

    We are all aware of the hand-wringing that accompanies humanities scholarship in the early 21st century. Soon enough there will be another article announcing the death or worthlessness of the humanities degree. Subsequently there will be a rebuttal which points out how crucial the humanities are. And the cycle will continue. I am not...

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    Roundtable: “Three Ways of Looking at Romantic Anatomy”

    by  • May 20, 2014 • 0 Comments

    Introduction Emily, Laura, and Arden are three graduate students who share interests in Romantic medical science and anatomy. We illustrate our contrasting methods in responding to this article (“Corpses and Copyrights”), which discusses the history of dissection in England through pictures of a medical textbook, William Cowper’s Myotomia reformata, or A New Administration of...

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    The Scholar between (The Limits of) Life and Politics

    by  • May 18, 2014 • 3 Comments

    This year, I went vegan. This past week, the ethical and environmental consequences of my veganism became profoundly challenged. In what follows, I use my experience as a scholar invested in animal studies and animal rights to begin exploring the meaning and tensions involved in the cultivation of an orientation where scholarship and the politics...

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    Interview: Dr. James McKusick

    by  • May 2, 2014 • 0 Comments

    One of Romanticism’s favorite ecocritics, Dr. James McKusick, explains how getting lost in the woods at the age of five helped inspire his brilliant book, Green Writing: Romanticism and Ecology. He shares, “I was playing with some friends and they went home. I went the other way and I was lost on my own...

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    Academic Writing & Emotigifs

    by  • May 2, 2014 • 0 Comments

    We’ve all seen them. Animated gif images, image macros, and memes on academic writing. You know the ones, like this: “When a friend asks how the dissertation is going”               Or, similarly, “When someone asks you how the diss is going”           There are...

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    Quarterly Editor’s Note: To Spring

    by  • April 20, 2014 • 0 Comments

    “Turn thine angel eyes upon our western isle which in full choir hails thy approach, O Spring” -William Blake, “To Spring” How true Blake’s words ring for this Chicagoan continuing to warm following the coldest winter on record. And so I write to wish all involved in the romantic studies blog(e)sphere a very collegial...

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    Advice: Five Scholars on Comprehensive Exams

    by  • March 24, 2014 • 1 Comment

    Constructing comprehensive exam lists is no easy feat. A friend of mine compares the process to building a personalized obstacle course and then having to master it; after all, the texts that appear on your exams are texts that you have personally chosen. Another friend compares constructing exam lists to building a wish list;...

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    Jane Austen and Romantic Mortification

    by  • March 20, 2014 • 0 Comments

    Perhaps surprisingly for its canonical status as a tale of romantic love, Pride and Prejudice (1813) is governed by many distinctly unromantic states of negative affect. Distress, embarrassment, depression, shame, and disbelief are all integral to Austen’s portrayals of character. But one emotional state stands out as being distinctively Austenian: mortification. Elizabeth Bennet is...

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